Sham, 1 year old, from the exhibition Where the Children Sleep

© Magnus Wennman

Fotografiska For Life is our platform for projects that aim to raise awareness about social issues and create debate and impact, using photography as a medium to illustrate, inform and inspire activity. We show the work of the world’s foremost photographers and photojournalists in a context that creates public impact and inspires our audience to learn more about issues that are close to our heart. Seminars and talks with leading experts on the subjects that we highlight are integral parts of the projects and important forums for debate. From the start, we have worked closely with established Human Rights organisations who have provided invaluable advice and experience from their particular fields of expertise; UNICEF, Save the Children, Human Rights Watch and Médecins Sans Frontières, to mention a few.

Through Fotografiska For Life, we strive to be a platform for creating and conveying knowledge through the medium of photography.

Sham, 1 year old, from the exhibition Where the Children Sleep

© Magnus Wennman

Cristina Mittermeier, Fisher girls, Madagascar 2008

Fotografiska’s mission is to be a world leading meeting place with the best photography exhibitions at its heart, while fostering social and cultural interaction.

Fotografiska uses its strong public presence and impact to be a catalyst for change. Today, Fotografiska has firmly established itself as an important forum for social debate and philanthropy. In September 2011, we started a foundation with the purpose to promote photographic projects that focus on human rights issues, especially projects that involve children and youths, as well as environmental issues. In February 2012, we proudly hosted Northern Future Forum, which featured nine European prime ministers.

Cristina Mittermeier, Fisher girls, Madagascar 2008

Farah, 2 years, from the exhibition Where the Children Sleep

© Magnus Wennman

Where the Children Sleep
Magnus Wennman
September 2015 – January 2016

Where do the children, fleeing from the Syrian war, go when the night falls? A few of these children offered to show where they sleep now, when everything that once was no longer exists. The exhibition Where the children sleeps is a cooperation between Fotografiska For Life, photographer Magnus Wennman and Aftonbladet. Magnus Wennman, winner of two World Press Photo Awards and Sweden’s Photographer of the Year in 2009, 2011, 2013, and 2014, met refugees in countless refugee camps and on their journeys through Europe. The story about when the night comes is a living narrative with no clear ending. Those pictures have been presented in UN as well as Capitol Hill and got published in a myriad of different publications all over the world.

Farah, 2 years, from the exhibition Where the Children Sleep

© Magnus Wennman

Paul Nicklen, Weeping Wall, Norway, 2014

Turning the Tide
Paul Nicklen and Cristina Mittermeier
July – August 2018

With world-class media, SeaLegacy captures endangered oceanic habitats and wildlife. The Fotografiska For Life exhibition Turning the Tide is showcasing photography by SeaLegacy’s founders, photojournalists Paul Nicklen and Cristina Mittermeier. SeaLegacy documents the often unseen beauty of these oceans, the dangers they face, and how they could flourish if aided by sustainable solutions. Eighty percent of fisheries are overexploited or collapsing. Pollution, especially plastics choke seabirds, seals, and whales. But once you protect a portion of the ocean, it starts healing itself in just five to ten years. SeaLegacy’s expeditions are designed based on the opportunity to create tipping points, by advocating and raising funds for change, education and inspiring all stakeholders, they engage with a million-strong community about the crisis and the opportunities to make a difference: To turn the tide. A perfect spot for the whole family to visit this summer.

Paul Nicklen, Weeping Wall, Norway, 2014

Jörgen Hildebrandt, Mary, Ghana

Smile – and the rest will follow
Jörgen Hildebrandt
November 2018 – February 2019

Smile and the rest will follow… But what if your face is seen as a sign that you’ve been cursed – and instead you’re faced with fear, ridicule and ostracism? This is the reality for many children born with cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP). A simple operation that can take less than an hour completely change someone’s life. Smile – and the rest will follow, a Fotografiska For Life exhibition where Jörgen Hildebrandt has followed Operation Smile’s work, using his emotionally moving photography to portray the lives of nine people in three countries. Through his images from Ghana, Mexico and the Philippines, we get to follow nine children and adults before, during and after their operations, which give them new lives overnight.

Jörgen Hildebrandt, Mary, Ghana

Jonathan Torgovnik, Intended Consequences

Intended Concequences
Jonathan Torgovnik
Spring 2011

This Fotografiska For Life exhibition featured the victims of the civilian warfare that took place during the Rwandan civil war in 1994. The award-winning photographer Jonathan Torgovnik met, during an interview in 2006 Margaret, a woman who shed light on the systematic abuse that had taken place. In “Intended Consequences” women and their children – who were results of the countless cases of rape – were portrayed and shared their fates years after the events. Fates that are riddled with fear, but that also contains hope for a better future for themselves and their children, even though they are daily reminders of the trauma they’ve experienced. Fotografiska For Life supported Rädda Barnen with a collection.

 

Jonathan Torgovnik, Intended Consequences

Lochebe Hunts

© Magnus Wennman

What’s on The Plate – what the children eat
Magnus Wennman and journalist Erik Wiman
5th July – 13th August 2017

20 million people was 2017 affected by famine in east Africa. Fotografiska For Life and Aftonbladet TV were in cooperation to support Save the Children in their work to save the starving and sick children. The exhibition What’s on The Plate – what the children eat, by photographer Magnus Wennman and journalist Erik Wiman, presented nine children’s horrible situations and also an unique 360-film about little Lochebe who hunt’s rats to survive. A boy who used to have a borrowed school uniform and a dream, instead he hunted with bow and arrow to try to support his family who lived of nothing then leafs.
“Decision-makers and the rest of us have to do everything we can. The What’s on the plate exhibition will create the commitment that is needed to focus more attention on this terrible disaster,” says Fotografiska’s CEO Per Broman.

Lochebe Hunts

© Magnus Wennman

Non Grata

© Åke Ericson

Non Grata
Åke Ericson
Fotografiska For Life 26 May – 28 August 2016

Åke Ericsons documentary photographic project about the Romani people of Europe and their living conditions was presented as Non Grata. A Fotografiska For Life-exhibition that also resulted in a trilingual phrase book (Romani, Romanian and English) freely distributed by the City Mission and Fotografiska, enabling the conversation to begin. Conversations that bridge the gap between “us and them”. During five years Ericson depicted the daily life of the Romani in ten countries: France, Serbia, Kosovo, Romania, Sweden, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Spain and Switzerland. The Romani are discriminated everywhere in Europe. They often live outside of society without human rights: social, political, cultural and economic. in cooperation with the City Mission.

Non Grata

© Åke Ericson

Emerich Roth

© Sanna Sjöswärd

Fading Stories – pass them on
Sanna Sjöswärd/Raoul Wallenberg Academy
Fotografiska Stockholm 27 August–20 October 2019

Fotografiska For Life exhibition Fading Stories – pass them on exhibited at Fotografiska Stockholm uses an app to display the portraits of 23 different holocaust survivors that have been photographed and interviewed by photographer Sanna Sjöswärd, and is a cooperation with Raoul Wallenberg Academy. They shared their stories of horrific experiences – in order to share their knowledge and the insight that we must all help to ensure that history is not repeated. Today, increasing polarisation in which different groups are pitched against each other means there is a desperate need for compassion and moral courage. Accordingly, the exhibition will open at Fotografiska on 27 August, Raoul Wallenberg’s Day the Swedish national day for equal rights, and civil courage, and will also be presented as school material.

Emerich Roth

© Sanna Sjöswärd