Fotografiska For Life & Rädda Barnen

Girls on the Move – the Unheard Stories

24 June — 19 September, 2021

For several years, Save the Children has conducted studies in South and North America, Africa, and Europe on girls who are on the move and in migration. In this exhibition, you have the opportunity to hear some of these girls share their experiences.

Every girl’s story is unique. They come from different countries on different continents. Some are on the run with their family, while others have left alone. Some are fleeing war and conflict, others from violent homes. Some leave with dreams of a better education or career. But these girls all share the same hope of a more secure future. And they have come together in Save the Children’s studies, which will be an important tool for providing increased knowledge and creating change.

Many girls on the move have told of places along the road that gave them temporary relief - physical spaces where they could briefly feel a sense of community. In southern Africa, hairdressing salons - often in simply furnished cargo containers - are one such place. Here, the girls have had the opportunity to exchange experiences with each other and offer support. These are one of the places where Save the Children has met these girls and heard their stories.

The salon here becomes a symbol of temporary stability in a tumultuous world. A place full of stories on the move, hopefully on the way to something better. The girls’ stories migrate across the walls, forming four of the most common escape routes in the world. The hair salon takes shape with their stories until it is completed, created by 20 million pixels - one for every girl who is currently on the move.

— My name is Pretty and I’m one of the 20 million girls that are on the move in the world today. Being a girl on the move is not easy and you face many challenges everywhere. In our home countries, during our migration journey and even after we reach our new country. But the stories from us girls go missing and can’t be found in the research about migrant children. That’s why we have shared our stories, to bridge this knowledge gap and make our experiences more seen and heard.

Musina, South Africa, April 11th, 2021

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