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© Cathleen Naundorf
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© Cathleen Naundorf
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La Broche
© Cathleen Naundorf
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Grand Palais III
© Cathleen Naundorf
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La fille en platre IV
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My Paradise Bird I
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Madame au Châtelet
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Pose Enchantée - Seredin & Vasiliev
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The Empty Cage
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The last sitting II
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Rami al ali
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Valentino en rose – by Cathleen Naundorf, Paris 2007
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Secret Times (Grand Palais I) – Chanel by Cathleen Naundorf, Paris 2010
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The Evolution of Fashion I by Cathleen Naundorf, Paris 2010
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The last sitting III – by Cathleen Naundorf, Paris 2011
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Homage to Horst P. Horst by Cathleen Naundorf, Paris 2008
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If there is a world somewhere in between fashion photography, art and reportage, that is where Cathleen Naundorf lives. Together with various exotic animals and beautiful models that seem to have walked straight out of Paris in the 1930’s. A typical image created by The German-French photographer shows a model in an extravagant evening dress and an eye-catching headdress of some kind (a hat made of feathers, a white fur ball, a wreath of living lobsters …). The model is posed against a painted background, much like the set design of the theatre: An enchanted forest, a deserted museum, a forgotten island. Sometimes, the edges of the set are clearly visible, we should not be fooled to believe that this is reality. But at the same time the details are so distinct and intricate that you may think the place must be real after all. And a lot of times it is, although in imagined form.

– I carry a sketchbook with me wherever I go. I take in my surroundings, describe them and draw them. From there they develop into stories and then images, says Cathleen Naundorf.

Both traveling and storytelling are close at hand for Naundorf who was a photojournalist throughout the 1990s, before moving into fashion photography in the 00’s. On top of that, her background is in fine art.

– From painting and photojournalism I have learned the art of observation. And that an image must always tell a story.

“It is about giving as well as taking.”

As a photojournalist, Naundorf visited such isolated places as Mongolia, Siberia, the Gobi desert and Greenland. She lived with the Yanomami tribe in the Amazon, with shamans in Siberia and with the Dalai Lama himself in Tibet while documenting their lives. The pictures ended up in several prestigious publications, such as National Geographic well as several photo books.

During her decade of travelling, Naundorf discovered two things: A deep reverence for ethnic groups and their cultures, and that she herself enjoys life as a nomad. Because just like the nomad, Naundorf can feel at home everywhere, as long as has her most essentials with her (a camera, that is). The restlessness, her appetite for adventure and a longing for the undiscovered is visible in her art as well: The imaginative places and secret worlds. Her respect for the crafted, detailed and culturally significant also derives from her time together with various indigenous peoples. This is what eventually brought her to fashion, especially the world of haute couture, which focuses on the exact same values.

– When working outdoors you have to observe the situation and press the shutter at the exact right moment. Sometimes you have to wait for days or weeks to get it right. During a fashion shoot I control the light, the setting, the whole situation myself. But I still have to find just the right moment to take the photo.

Fashion vs art?

It was particularly the project “Un rêve de mode” (“A fashion dream”) that took Naundorf’s fashion photography to a new level. Focusing on six couture houses: Chanel, Dior, Gaultier, Valentino, Elie Saab and Lacroix, Naundorf photographed haute couture creations from their archives. She, of course, chose the model, the setting and the look herself and the result is timeless images where the garments are part of the art. Naundorf herself sees no distinction between fashion and art photography, both are the same. However, there is a difference between photographing men and women.

– Men are easy to photograph, they are casual and happy with themselves. Women want to look beautiful and I help them look even more beautiful with the right light, pose and setting. I usually use the same models over and over, it is more intimate and you learn to communicate and trust each other. If that trust does not exist, I am not interested in taking the photo. It is about giving as well as taking.

Her photos require careful preparation involving sketches and technique. In film terms, Naundorf is the director, scenographer, screenwriter and photographer all in one. The images, the settings and the moods all originate from her and her imagination alone.

– I paint and prepare how the light should fall, the background, the setting, the model’s makeup, yes everything! I use a large format camera and only film or polaroid. It’s a fine old fashioned method, it’s real photography.

But bringing out the dreamlike quality that characterizes her images requires a time-consuming technique. Not only do the preparations take a long time, some of her large format cameras and films are not even in production anymore (she has large stocks in her studios in Paris and London).

– I enlarge my pictures, sometimes up to 1.80 meters and I only use a special print paper from Japan. I paint on the photo with a brush, by hand, until the picture is perfect. It takes a long time but the result is astonishing. It’s like a haute couture dress: Everything is done by hand and perfect down to the smallest detail. It’s unique.

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